Make Your Own Kombucha and Save Lots of Money

Kombucha is a fermented tea that has many proven health benefits such as healing your gut to helping arthritis.  You can drink it straight or cook with it. Kombucha makes a wonderful healthy base for salad dressings, and makes for a great marinade as well.  Kombucha turns to vinegar if it ferments too long, and makes a wonderful antibacterial spray for cleaning.  You can also use it as a rinse after washing your hair, for beautiful, silky hair.

It is becoming very popular these days.  I’ve noticed over the past year or there are more and more brands of commercially brewed kombucha on grocery store shelves.  More display space is dedicated to this healthy, fermented drink in grocery stores now, and it seems the price of kombucha is getting higher and higher too.

I started drinking kombucha in 2014.  I read about the wonderful health benefits of kombucha, as well as other naturally fermented foods, so thought I’d give it a try.  It was love at first sip for me!  I was hooked immediately.  I bought kombucha every time I went to the grocery store, and loved trying out new flavors.

Eventually, I realized I was spending a lot of money on store bought kombucha, so I set out to try brewing my own.  I bought a scoby (Symbiotic Culture Of Bacteria and Yeast) from an Amazon seller and found some instructions online.  I started brewing my kombucha in a gallon sized mason jar.  This worked well for me, but I didn’t like waiting a few weeks between harvests every time I started a new brew.  I like to drink a large glass of kombucha daily, for the health benefits, so I looked for an easy way to have a continuous supply of the healthy brew.

Luckily, I found “Kombucha Mama”, aka Hanna Crum, and her wonderful and informative store and educational site Kombucha Kamp.  I learned about the Kombucha Brewing Method of the Ancients – Continuous Brew and placed an order immediately. I bought a black ceramic brewer with a stainless steel spout and a purple “cap” to keep dust and insects out.  My beautiful continuous brewing vessel came with a huge, healthy scoby, instructions, sample tea, some ph test strips and a temperature gauge.  Pretty much everything except the sugar!  The best part of it all was access to many easy to follow instructional videos covering anything and everything you need to know about brewing kombucha in a continuous brewer.  Once you purchase a system, you always have access to tons of resources on how to make your own kombucha.

You can Find Out More About Continuous Brewing by clicking here.

How to Make Your Own Kombucha (using the continuous brew method)

These instructions are for making kombucha in a 2 gallon vessel.

For your first batch of kombucha, double the recipe below in order to make a full 2 gallons of kombucha.  When it’s ready to drink, pour out half (1 gallon) into containers and refrigerate (or bottle and flavor with fruit in order to make a fizzy flavored second fermentation- more about that in another post.

Once you’ve made your first 2 gallon batch of kombucha, brewing subsequent batches is quick and easy.  Here’s how:

Ingredients:

Equipment Needed:

Directions

  1. Pour approximately 1 gallon of finished kombucha (from your 2 gallon brewer) into containers.  Refrigerate and enjoy it.
  2. Heat approximately 4 cups of filtered water to just before a rolling boil.
  3. Place the tea into a large tea bag or a tea infuser.
  4. Place the tea infuser into the hot water and let it sit for 20 minutes.
  5. Add sugar and stir until dissolved.
  6. Let the sweetened tea cool for 30 minutes or more.
  7. Fill a one gallon jug or pitcher about half full of filtered water.
  8. Pour the sweet tea into the water, then fill it up to the top with more filtered water.  Stir of shake.
  9. Pour the freshly brewed sweet tea into your half empty 2 gallon vessel.  (You can pour it right on top of the scoby)
  10. “Harvest” your kombucha when it doesn’t taste sweet, or when the pH is 2.5 – 3.
  11. Repeat the process.

For variety, you can play around with flavors by blending different types of tea.  After your scoby is well established you can also add nutritious, tasty and colorful elements such as hibiscus leaves.  If you like your kombucha fizzy, you can add fruit and herbs and bottle it (using heavy grolsch style bottles) for a few days, creating a second fermentation.

Hint: I always write down the day I started my new batch of kombucha. This way, you’ll always know when it’s close to harvest time. My established tea and scoby takes 4 days to finish in the summertime. A little longer in the winter due to cooler temperatures.

 

Below are links to some of the products I use to brew kombucha.  I do get a small commission if you buy, which helps pay the bills.  If you’re interested in purchasing supplies to brew your own kombucha, I’d appreciate it greatly if you go through my links 🙂


 

Make Your Own Kombucha and Save Lots of Money
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Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons loose leaf tea (I've found the best tea for kombucha is black tea, white tea, green tea, or oolong tea.  You can even combine these teas to make different flavors.  Organic tea is what I recommend.
  • 1 cup Organic cane sugar
  • 3 to 4 cups Filtered water

Instructions

  1. Pour approximately 1 gallon of finished kombucha (from your 2 gallon brewer) into containers.  Refrigerate and enjoy it.
  2. Heat approximately 4 cups of filtered water to just before a rolling boil.
  3. Place the tea into a large tea bag or a tea infuser.
  4. Place the tea infuser into the hot water and let it sit for 20 minutes.
  5. Add sugar and stir until dissolved.
  6. Let the sweetened tea cool for 30 minutes or more.
  7. Fill a one gallon jug or pitcher about half full of filtered water.
  8. Pour the sweet tea into the water, then fill it up to the top with more filtered water.  Stir of shake.
  9. Pour the freshly brewed sweet tea into your half empty 2 gallon vessel.  (You can pour it right on top of the scoby)
  10. "Harvest" your kombucha when it doesn't taste sweet, or when the pH is 2.5 - 3.
  11. Repeat the process.

Tags

Diet
vegetarian
vegan
lacto vegetarian
ovo vegetarian
Whole 30
Healthy
Allergy
gluten free
dairy free
egg free
soy free
wheat free
peanut free
seafood free
treenut free
sesame free
mustard free
Courses
Beverages
Cooking
Fermenting
Cuisines
Probiotic
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